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(Hilo) – Rapid ʻŌhiʻa Death (ROD), the fungal disease that’s impacted hundreds of thousands of acres of native ‘ōhi‘a forests in Hawai‘i, is the actual reason for the ʻŌhiʻa Love Festival today at the ‘Imiloa Astronomy Center. Now in its second year, more than a thousand people honored ‘ōhi‘a and the many people working to stop the spread of ROD and find effective treatments for it. The festival goes beyond the disease.

(Maunakea) – Two weeks before the hunting season for game birds opens in Hawai‘i, hunters, researchers and staff from the DLNR Division of Forestry and Wildlife (DOFAW) traipsed across the rugged terrain on Maunakea’s north slopes to gain a better understanding of game bird density, variety and populations.

(Lihu‘e)  – School children from Kalaheo Elementary School and Island School helped release ten fledgling ‘A‘o (Newell’s Shearwaters) over the last two days during the annual E Ho‘opomaika‘i ‘ia na Manu ‘A‘o (A Cultural Release of the Native Newell’s Shearwater) event at Lydgate Park.  The young seabirds had been rescued by people then rehabilitated by Save Our Shearwaters (SOS). Before they started their journey back out to sea, Kupuna Maureen Fodale offered a pule (Hawaiian prayer).

(Honolulu) - A wastewater system improvement project by the Department of Land & Natural Resources Engineering and State Park divisions is currently being conducted at the Keaīwa Heiau State Recreation Area. The project started October 1st and is expected to take several months with an anticipated completion in March 2019 or earlier. The contractor is RHS Lee Inc. Project cost is $186,200.

(Honolulu) - Following the rockslide event more than two weeks ago, the Manoa Falls Trail and Aihualama Trail reopen tomorrow, Monday, October 8, 2018. The trails also reopen to commercial tour vendors on Monday.

(Hilo) – During a regularly scheduled quarterly aerial assessment of forests on Hawai‘i island in late July, spotters detected more trees “symptomatic” for the presence of C. lukuohia, the fungus more commonly known as Rapid ʻŌhiʻa Death. These trees are in the Kalōpā State Recreation Area on the Hamakua Coast and after the helicopter surveys utilizing digital mobile sketch mapping (DMSM), ground crews from the Big Island Invasive Species Committee (BIISC) followed up by taking ground samples.

HONOLULU --   Imagine waking up one day and finding there was no water.  No water to drink or to cook with.  No water to brush your teeth, to shower, flush the toilet, or do laundry with.  No water to fight fires or to irrigate our food crops.  Hospitals would close, schools would close, businesses would shut down.

(Kihei) -A wise old saying, an ‘olelo no‘eau, sums up what the staff at ‘Āhihi-Kina‘u (NAR) hope people will get out of its new information kiosk: Everybody paddles the canoes together; bail and paddle, paddle and bail, and the shore is reached (E lauhoe mai na wa‘a; i ke kā, i ka hoe; i ka hoe, i ke kā; pae aku i ka ‘āina).

(HONOLULU) — Are you passionate about trees and their value for our well-being? Do you have professional experience you would like to apply to improving our urban and community forests and green spaces across the state? The Kaulunani Urban and Community Forestry Program is seeking qualified and enthusiastic applicants for its Urban and Community Forestry Advisory Council.

(Hilo, HI) – Tomorrow will mark a year since the successful reintroduction of critically endangered Hawaiian crows into the forests of Hawai’i. Yesterday researchers with The ʻAlalā Project released five more ‘Alalā into the Pu‘u Maka‘ala Natural Area Reserve. These birds will join eleven ‘Alalā already thriving in native forests on the windward slopes of Mauna Loa.

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