Announcements

The Department of Land and Natural Resources, Division of Forestry and Wildlife will briefly close the Keanae Arboretum for two days, on Wednesday, March 29 and Thursday, March 30, 2017. This closure will allow a contractor to safely remove trees that recently fell across the trail within the arboretum. The arboretum will reopen on Friday March 31.

The Department of Land and Natural Resources’ (DLNR) Division of Forestry and Wildlife (DOFAW), in cooperation with the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) Forest Service, is now accepting applications for vacant seats on the Laupāhoehoe Advisory Council (LAC) and the Pu‘u Wa‘awa‘a Advisory Council (PAC) on Hawai‘i island. Both forest areas are part of the Hawaii Experimental Tropical Forest. DOFAW works with the Forest Service to do research in these areas.

HONOLULU — Since 1979, more than 68,000 students have received their certifications through the Department of Land and Natural Resources (DLNR) Hunter Education Program. Annually, more than 2,000 students register and attend Hunter Education classes across the state. This experience is now about to get just a little easier for the public.

HONOLULU -- The popular Manoa Falls hiking trail will be closed all day, on Monday, February 13, while state forestry crews remove a 100-foot fallen Albizia tree, and aging composting toilets at the trailhead.

WAILUKU -- The popular 2.5 mile Waihe‘e ridge trail that climbs the windward slope of the west Maui mountains will be temporarily reopened tomorrow, Saturday February 11, following completion of a first phase of improvements for increased public safety through surface improvements, drainage upgrades, and vegetative management.

HONOLULU – Warning signs will be installed starting next week, to alert hikers about the possible presence of unexploded ordnance (UXO) at the start of several popular hiking trails in Maunawili Valley, which were once a part of a former military training camp located on the windward side of O‘ahu.

If you drive a car, fly in a plane, use air-conditioning to cool your home, or engage in other activity powered by fossil fuels that emit greenhouse gas, you may soon have new ways to offset your emissions locally, by supporting Hawaiian forest restoration.

(HONOLULU) – When 7-year-old Malia Rillamas first spotted the bird, she pointed it out to her dad Jonathan. The family, from Haleiwa, pulled off the country road on O‘ahu’s north shore on the afternoon of Jan. 15, 2017 to see if they could help. A short time later Brian Smith of Wahiawa also pulled over. Together the trio watched as the pueo (Hawaiian short-eared owl), hopped across the road and ultimately into a deep roadside ditch. They discussed what to do and who to call and eventually called 9-1-1 which put them in touch with the DLNR Division of Conservation and Resources Enforcement (DOCARE).

Watch "The Endangered Forest Birds of Hawaii," to learn about extraordinary efforts underway to save rare, endemic birds from extinction.

(Wailuku, Maui) It’s the only Natural Area Reserve in Hawai‘i where the ocean and water activities are the primary draw for visitors and residents. The Ahihi-Kina’u Natural Area Reserve has one mile of open coastline and attracts hundreds of people every day to surf, snorkel, or simply to enjoy the clear waters of the Reserve. It’s part of a vast ocean playground on Maui’s south shore, with the corridor managed and maintained by a variety of county and state agencies. This means there are different rules and guidelines for each locale. Fishing might be allowed in one place but not another. One area may be closed, another is open. Dogs are allowed here, but not there.