Glory Bush

tibouchinaGlory bush (Tibouchina)

Also known as: Lasiandra, princess flower, glory tree, cane ti or longleaf glory tree

Description:
Tibouchina species usually have fuzzy leaves with prominent veins and showy purple flowers. Tibouchina plants have been grown as ornamentals.

tibouchina2Harm:

  • Tibouchina threatens native areas by forming monotypic thickets that outcompete and displace native plants.
  • Tibouchina longifolia has naturalized in native ohia forest on the Big Island. Tibouchina urvilleana and Tibouchina herbacea have infested areas of Hawaii Volcanoes National Park.
  • Tibouchina species belong to the family Melastomataceae, which includes Miconia calvescens and many other highly invasive plants.
  • Certain Tibouchina species are considered invasive in New Zealand and are excluded from French Polynesia.
  • All 350 plants in the genus Tibouchina have been declared noxious weeds by the State of Hawaii. It is illegal to sell or transport noxious weeds.

In Hawaii:
Kauai: Tibouchina urvilleana has naturalized in Kokee State Park and is still grown ornamentally.
Oahu: Currently Tibouchina is not known to occur in Oahu forests but many are still grown ornamentally. The Oahu Invasive Species Committee will remove your Tibouchina plant and replace it with a native plant for free. Call 286-4616 for information.
Maui: Certain species of Tibouchina have naturalized on Maui and become pests in native forests, crowding out endangered plant species.
Big Island: Certain species of Tibouchina have naturalized on the Big Island and become pests in native forests, crowding out endangered plant species

For more information, see: