Keiki Corner

 

The Division of Aquatic Resources is hosting an
herbivore fish keiki
coloring contest!


What are herbivore fish?

They are fish that eat algae as their main source of food. Herbivores eat the algae and keep it from overgrowing, helping it to stay in balance on the reef. They are like the coral reef’s natural gardeners! The manini (convict tang) and kala (blue-spined unicorn fish) are two examples of herbivore fish.

Please click below to download a manini or kala coloring page

Click below to download a version in ‘ōlelo Hawai‘i!

Eligibility and Rules:

• This contest will be open to keiki up to age 12
• Keiki 8 and under can enter by submitting a colored drawing of the manini or kala
• For ages 9-12, they can enter by submitting a personal drawing and short statement that describes the importance of herbivores in coral reefs
• Contest will be judged with entries separated by the following categories: <5 years, 5-8 years, 9-12 years old
• Only one submission per keiki

Prizes:
• One winner will be selected from each age group (a total of 3 winners)
• Winning pictures will be posted on our Department of Land and Natural Resources DAR Holomua website
• Winners will receive a gift certificate for a fishing store on their respective island
• Winners will be contacted through email and/or phone
• Participants whose pictures are selected as honorable mentions will also be available for viewing on the Holomua website

How to enter:
• Download and print one of the herbivore species at https://www.dlnr.hawaii.gov/marine30x30/
• Color it with crayons, markers, pencil, or paints
• Parent/Legal Guardian signature required along with contact information
• Email submissions to [email protected] or mail to: DLNR Division of Aquatic Resources 1151 Punchbowl St #330 Honolulu HI 96813
• Updated: Entries must be received by 5:00pm HST February 8, 2022
• Make sure to include full name, age, island, and for the 9-12 year category, a description of your herbivore and a short statement that describes the importance of herbivores in helping the reef