ʻAiea Loop Trail
Hawaii hikers

**IMPORTANT PARK NOTICES**

Monitor local surf and weather reports prior to your park visit.

[KAUAʻI] UPDATED 5/19/24 –Kauaʻi North shore shuttle departures have RESUMED.

[O’AHU] UPDATED 5/18/24- Diamond Head State Monument: The park will remain CLOSED through Sunday, May 19, due to inclement weather and rock falls.  Safety concerns are being addressed and we anticipate reopening on Monday.

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[O’AHU] UPDATED 5/16/24 –  Ka’ena Point State Park, Mokuleʻia Section: Vehicle access road has CLOSED due to saturated roads and inclement weather.

[HAWAI’I] UPDATED 5/13/24 – Akaka Falls State Park to Temporarily CLOSE Weekdays Starting May 15, see Akaka Falls announcement for more information.

[HAWAIʻI] UPDATED 5/13/24 – Wailuku River State Park: Rainbow Falls; tree trimming starts today until 6/7/24, the park will remain OPEN but some areas may be temporarily closed due to safety.

[KAUAʻI] UPDATED 4/30/24 – Kōkeʻe State Park: Kalalau lookout restroom is CLOSED until further notice.

[KAUAʻI] UPDATED 4/26/24 –Kalalau Trail, Nāpali Coast State Wilderness Park: Camping permits held back for local residents during summer, see Kalalau Trail site for more information.

[KAUAʻI] UPDATED 3/18/24 – Kōkeʻe State Park: The gate to Puʻu O Kila Lookout will be closed to vehicular traffic due to road repairs beginning 3/19/24. The lookout will still be accessible by pedestrians, parking is available at Kalalau lookout.

ʻAiea Loop Trail

Trail Length 4.8 mile loop
Activity Pedestrian
Difficulty Easy to Moderate
Terrain Forested and Open Ridge
Elevation Gain 900 ft
Trail Brochure Keaīwa Heiau Brochure
Park Name Keaīwa Heiau State Recreation Area

Description

The ‘Aiea Loop Trail is 4.8-mile trail that begins and ends in the park. This trail runs along the ridge on the west side of Halawa Valley and offers views of the southern coastline of O‘ahu from Pearl Harbor (Pu‘uloa) and the Wai‘anae Range to Honolulu and Diamond Head (Le‘ahi).

Much of this area was replanted by foresters in the late 1920s. The lemon eucalyptus trees give the air a light citrus fragrance. Stands of Norfolk Island pine trees mark the lower end of the trail. Look for the native koa and ohi‘a trees as you reach Pu‘u Uau, the high point about midway along the length of the trail. You might also see remnants of a B-24 bomber that crashed in 1944.

This hike is not strenuous but involves some gradual uphill climbs with a steep switchback and a stream crossing at the end of the trail. The trail may be muddy with sections of exposed tree roots. Give yourself about 2.5 to 3 hours for the hike and enjoy the plants and the sound of birds around you.

Route

The trailhead is off the park road at the upper eastern end of the park marked by parking lots, picnic pavilions and restroom. Park your car in a marked stall and look for the trail sign. The trail will come out at the lower campgrounds. Follow the park road back to your car.

Directions

Follow H-1 to Moanalua Highway (Route 78). Take the ‘Aiea cutoff to the third traffic light, make a right turn at ‘Aiea Heights Drive and follow it about 3 miles up to the end of the road. Continue on the one-way park road to the trailhead.

Additional Info

  • Mountain biking is no longer allowed on this trail.
  • Stay on the trail.
  • Keep dogs on leash.
  • Pack out at least what you pack in.
  • No open fires.