10/01/14 – ARCHAEOLOGY WEEK EVENTS

Posted on Oct 2, 2014 in News Releases, State Historic Preservation Division

ARCHAEOLOGY WEEK EVENTS

Archaeology Week is a national program to promote the preservation of our country’s heritage. Sponsored by the SHA, Hawaiʻi Archaeology Week in October to integrate with the organization’s annual conference.

The Society for Hawaiian Archaeology (SHA) is a tax-exempt organization established in 1980 to promote and stimulate interest and research in the archaeology of the Hawaiian Islands and encourage a more rational public appreciation of the aims and limitations of archaeological research. Each year, the SHA publishes an Archaeology Week Poster using contributions from state and federal agencies and member donations, and also makes available a comprehensive online Archaeology Week Resources Guide. The posters are distributed to local, state and federal agencies and private entities to help promote the preservation of Hawai’i’s archaeological heritage.

For more information on SHA, read the society’s journal Hawaiian Archaeology, established in 1984. For more on Archaeology Week, visit http://hawaiianarchaeology.org/.

HAWAIʻI ISLAND

October 3:       Laupāhoehoe Area Sites – North Hilo (9 am – 2:45 pm)

 This huakaʻi (tour) of the Laupāhoehoe area will stop at sites for presentations by Dr. Peter Mills on the history and traditional stories from pre and post contact times. Meet at the ʻImiloa parking lot above UH Hilo at 9:00 am. Places visited will include the Oʻokala lithic scatter, historical sites near the forest reserve boundary, and the Laupāhoehoe Train Station. There is a $5 Train Museum entrance fee. Waiver of liability forms will need to be filled out for the plantation camp site.

Contact Peter Mills (millsp@hawaii.edu) to register; space is limited.

Bring hiking clothes, covered shoes, water, sunscreen bug spray and lunch.

 

October 3:       State Historic Preservation Division Archaeology Branch Open House (8 am-3pm)

The archaeology branch office at 40 Poʻokela Street, Hilo welcomes the public to come by and hear about how we register archaeological sites and conduct historic preservation reviews. Office tours, talk story and light pupus will be provided during the day; no appointments necessary.

Contact Theresa Donham at 933-7653 (Theresa.K.Donham@hawaii.gov) or Sean Nāleimaile at 933-7651 (Sean.P.Naleimaile@hawaii.gov) for directions.

 

October 6:       Historic KaʻawaloaTrail Hike (9 am -2 pm)

Join Kaʻawaloa descendent Lee Ann Leslie along with State Parks archaeologist Tracy Tam Sing and State Historic Preservation Division archaeologist Michael Vitousek on a hike down the Kaʻawaloa trail. On the way down to Kaʻawaloa we will stop at the Mauna Alani homesite, built in 1852 by reverend J.D. Paris, and continuously occupied by members of the family since. The Kaʻawaloa Settlement is a unique cultural landscape where archaeological and ethno-historical information blend together. Check out the efforts undertaken by State Parks to preserve and protect this resource. The hike is highly strenuous 1,400 ft. elevation change over uneven ground. It’s easy to hike down but hard to climb back up. Participants should be in good physical condition. We will meet at the Aloha Gas Station in Kaʻawaloa Mauka at 9:00 am and return at 2pm.

Contact Mike Vitousek at 652-1510 or Michael.Vitousek@hawaii.gov to make a reservation; space is limited.

Bring good hiking shoes, backpack, lots of water, lunch, snorkeling gear, towel and sunscreen.

 

 October 7:       Ala Kahakai Trail Identification Workshop (7 am – 12 noon)

Ala Kahakai National Historic Trail staff will be conducting an ancient and historic trail identification workshop. Participants will hike approximately 2 miles along the North Kohala shoreline from Makiloa to Kiʻiokalani. Trail staff will share evidence of the alaloa, mauka-makai trails, as well as the many special places along the way. The hike is on uneven terrain, with little shade.

Contact Rick Gmirkin at 808-430-5213, rick_gmirkin@nps.gov to reserve a spot, we are limiting the amount of participants to fifteen.

Participants should bring plenty of water, snacks, sturdy hiking footwear, and sun protection.

 

October 9:       Open House, ASM Affiliates(9 am – 3 pm)

Dr. Robert Rechtman, Vice President of ASM Affiliates, an archaeological consulting firm, is opening his offices to the public for tours and talk story October 9 and 10. The office is located at 507-A East Lanikaula Street in Hilo.

Contact Dr. Rechtman at brechtman@asmaffiliates.comor call 969-6066 for more information and directions.

 

October 10:     Keaukaha Coastline – Waiākea Ahupuaʻa, Hilo (9 am – noon)

Keaukaha ʻĀina Hoʻopulapula: Keaukaha is the second oldest Hawaiian homestead community established under the Hawaiian Homelands Commission Act in 1924. Located Southeast of Hilo Town, Keaukaha was famed for its lush hala groves and rich marine resources. This huakaʻi will introduce the various wahi pana or named places that are scattered along the coastline. Each wahi pana that can be found along Keaukaha’s rocky coastline and has a unique history that continues to enrich Keaukaha’s written and oral histories. Open to first 20 people who register.

Contact Halena Kapuni-Reynolds (halenakapry@gmail.com) to register. If you need transportation, contact UʻilaniMacabio (Macabio@hawaii.edu).

Bring clothes fit for trekking through rugged coastline; shoes or tabis preferred; some areas may be slippery. Pack water, sunscreen and snacks as needed.

 

October 10:     Laupāhoehoe Area Sites – North Hilo (9 am -2:45 pm)

This huakaʻi of the Laupāhoehoe area will stop at sites for presentations by Dr. Peter Mills on the history and traditional stories from pre and post contact times. Meet at the ʻImiloa parking lot above UH Hilo at 9:00 am. Places visited will include the Oʻokala lithic scatter, historical sites near the forest reserve boundary, and the Laupāhoehoe Train Station. There is a $5 Train Museum entrance fee. Waiver of liability forms will need to be filled out for the plantation camp site. 

Contact Peter Mills (millsp@hawaii.edu) to register; space is limited.

Bring hiking clothes, covered shoes, water, sunscreen bug spray and lunch.

 

October 10:     Keʻaumuku Archaeological Sites, Pōhakuloa (9:30 am – 1:30 pm 

The Keʻaumuku Sheep Station is an archaeological site from Hawaiʻi’s ranching period and was used from the mid-19th century until the 1960s, when Parker Ranch closed it down and moved the remaining buildings to Waimea. The PTA Cultural Resources Staff have been managing the site since the US Army purchased the parcel from Parker Ranch in the early 2000s. We will tour the site with Dr. Julie Taomia and discuss the protective measures that have been put in place around it. Meet at the Pōhakuloa Training Area (PTA) Headquarters parking lot at 9:30 am.Participants will need to have valid government issued ID, and all vehicles should have current insurance, registration and safety check. Show ID, drive straight toward Mauna Loa to the parking lot in front of you. Depending on the need, transportation may be provided; PTA staff will provide transportation after arrival at PTA. Forms will need to be signed at PTA headquarters.

Contact Julie Taomia (Julie.m.taomia.civ@mail.mil) to register and if you need driving directions to PTA.

Bring hiking clothes, water, sunscreen, sunglasses, bug spray, lunch and snacks. Recommend long pants and layers (it could be cold in the morning and warm up in the afternoon).

 

October 10:     Baker’s Beach Heiau Service Day (9 am – 2 pm)

Participate in the on-going vegetation cleaning of the last intact heiau located along Hilo Bay. Uncle Don Pakele, coordinator of the state-approved curator group for the heiau will provide background on the site and its history. We will be removing weeds and grass from the area and the access trail. Numbers are limited, so please make a reservation.

Contact Uncle Don Pakele at 960-4203 for directions, more information, and to make a reservation.

Bring work clothes appropriate for general yard work (gloves, hat, shoes), sunscreen, filled water bottle (additional water will be provided), and lunch.

 

 

KAUAʻI

October 4:       Walking Archaeology/History Tour of Waimea (9 am – noon)

We will explore Waimea’s history from pre-contact times through the historic era, visiting several historic sites and landmarks, and hearing about the history, cultural traditions and spirituality of the area. Meet at Kauaʻi Technology Center, 9565 Kaumualii Highway, Waimea. The tour will be led by Aletha Kaohi, lifetime Waimea resident and historian.

Contact Mary Jane Naone, State Historic Preservation Division at 271-4940 or via email (Maryjane.naone@hawaii.gov)

Bring water, sunscreen, comfortable walking shoes

 

October 5:       Sites of Kukuiʻula (8 am – 2:30 pm; flexible schedule)

We will visit four important cultural sites within Kukuiʻula

(A&B Properties & Kukuiʻula):

  • 8:00 am: Lama Ku site. Meet at the Kukuiʻula entrance at 8 am and we will drive as a group to the top of the area in the golf course. Number limited to 14 people.
  • 9:30 am: Heiau, Prince Kuhio birth site (Royal Order of Kamehameha), fishpond and house site. Meet at Prince Kuhio Park, in the parking lot or along Lawai Road. No number limit.
  • 10:30 am: Kukuiʻula Preserve (heiau, dryland loʻi kalo, railroad berm); search for sites in the brush. Behind Prince Kuhio Park. No number limit.
  • 12:00 noon: Queen’s Trail along the south shore to Lawai. Meet and park at the Spouting Horn parking lot. No number limit.

Contact Nancy McMahon,County of Kauaʻi, Exploration Associates and FEMA, at

639-6695 (nmcmahon@kauai.gov)

Bring water, sunscreen, comfortable walking shoes and snacks as needed

 

October 7:       Presentation and Field Trip to Alekoko (Menehune) Fishpond (9 am – 11 am)

Presentation: Fishponds of Kaua’i at the Hawaii DOT building conference room (Puhi) 1720 Haleukana Street, Lihue. Following the presentation, we will car pool to Alekoko Fishpond.

Contact Mary Jane Naone, State Historic Preservation Division at 271-4940 or via email (Maryjane.naone@hawaii.gov)

BringWater, sunscreen, comfortable walking shoes

 

 

LANAʻI

October 8:       Huaka‘i Māka‘ika‘i Ma Lāna‘i a Kaululā‘au (day trip)

 A cultural Landscapes Excursion to the Lāna‘i Culture & Heritage Center, followed by a field outing to Kaunolū and Hi‘i on the Island of Lāna‘i. Hosted by Pūlama Lāna‘i Culture & Historic Preservation Branch Staff. If people are traveling from Honolulu, they should plan to catch the first flight which leaves around 6 a.m., and return to O’ahu on the flight that departs around 3:30 p.m. (Island Air). If the group is between 10 to 15 pax, ground transportation will be provided.

Contact Kepā Maly at 808-565-3308 or kmaly@pulamalanai.com to register or for more information.

Bring appropriate clothing and shoes for a walk through section of thorned kiawe overgrowth, sun block, and any supplies necessary for health or personal care. I will also need to request that each participant sign a liability waiver for the land owner. The Kaunolū will require a medium physical capacity, with the ability to walk on slopes.

 

MAUI

October 3 & 6: Walking Tourof HalekiiHeiau and Pihana Heiau State Park (9 am- noon)

Experience Haleki‘i and Pihana Heiau: two significant Hawaiian structures of religious and historical importance located in Wailuku along the west side of ‘Ῑao Stream. Haleki‘i translates as image house. Pihana (fullness or gathering) is also known as Pi‘ihana and Pihanakalani (gathering of the supernatural). The Site overlooks ‘Ῑao Stream, Kahului Bay, Wailuku Plain, Happy Valley, and Paukūkalo Hawaiian Homesteads.

Contact Jenny Pickett at 808-243-5169 or email Jenny.L.Pickett@hawaii.gov

Bring water, sunscreen, bug spray, comfortable clothes and mats or blankets for seating. No toilet facilities are available at the park.

 

October 8:       State Historic Preservation Division Archaeology Branch Open House (9 am-1 pm) 

The archaeology branch office at 130 Mahalani Street, Wailuku welcomes the public to visit our offices and library. Come and hear about how we register archaeological sites, manage GIS data, and conduct historic preservation reviews. Sign up to be a volunteer or learn how to help take care of our historic resources. Office tours, site photos, talk story, and light pupus will be provided during the day; no appointments necessary.

ContactJenny Pickett at 808-243-5169 (Jenny.L.Pickett@hawaii.gov).

 

OʻAHU

October 3:           State Historic Preservation Division Archaeology Branch Open House (8 am-3pm)

The archaeology branch office at 601Kamokila Boulevard, Room 555, Kapolei welcomes the public to come and hear about how we register archaeological sites, manage GIS data and conduct historic preservation reviews. Office tours, talk story and light pupus will be provided during the day; no appointments necessary.

Call Susan Lebo692-8019 (Susan.Lebo@hawaii.gov) for directions.

 

October 4:       O’ahu Nui Stone and Kūkaniloko Birth Stones Site Visits(10:00 am –1:00 pm)

Meet at O’ahu Nui Stone (Waikakalaua Gulch – small park on right) at 10:00am for a brief history of the significance of the O’ahu Nui Stone; then drive to Kūkaniloko Birth Stones site (birthplace of ruling chiefs – across Whitmore Avenue) for an interpretive overview by Kahu Tom Lenchanko.

Contact Tom Lenchanko (tlenchanko1@hawaii.rr.com)

Bring water and snacks, bug spray, comfortable clothes and mats/chairs for seating at Kūkaniloko. No toilet facilities available at Kūkaniloko.

 

 

October 5:       Kaniakapūpū (Kamehameha III Summer Palace) Service Day (9:00 am – noon)

Meet at BOW lily pond (Old Pali Rd) at 9:00am; 1.5hr tour of the area learning the history of the ahupua’a, Kaniakapūpū, and La Ho’iho’iEa from Kahu Kaho’ōla; then plant ti, remove weeds from structure; followed by making pu’ohe (bamboo trumpet instrument) from bamboo in the area.

Contact Dr. Baron “Kahoʻola” Ching (bchingahoola@gmail.com)

Bring water and snacks, bug spray, comfortable clothes and hiking shoes. No toilet facilities available.

 

October 8 & 10: Public Program: Archaeology at Bishop Museum (1 – 1:30 pm)

As part of Bishop Museum’s public programming, Bishop Museum staff members will bring out some of their favorite objects from the Archaeology Collections to share with members of the public during this ½-hour talk in the Hawaiian Hall Atrium. Bishop Museum’s archaeology collections include over a million cultural objects from throughout the Hawaiian and Pacific Islands.

This event is free for Bishop Museum members. For non-members, it is included with regular daily admission. More information about admission rates can be found at www.bishopmuseum.org/visitors/