Invasive Species

(HONOLULU) – A new animated video highlights the success story of how biocontrol, a process where a carefully selected living organism is used to control an invasive species, helped to save the native Wiliwili tree. The video, produced by the DLNR Division of Forestry and Wildlife (DOFAW) in collaboration with the Coordinating Group on Alien Pest Species, also shows how biocontrol can continue to be an important tool in managing invasive species in Hawaiʻi.

(LĪHU‘E) – The recent detection of a new population of Little Fire Ant (LFA) in Wailua River State Park, was confirmed by a sample submitted by a concerned citizen, showing how essential residents are to the process.

(HONOLULU) – Significant federal dollars are headed to Hawai‘i to help address the extinction crisis facing at least four species of native Hawaiian birds. An unprecedented $14 million for Hawai‘i ecosystem restoration is included in the Bipartisan Infrastructure Law, described as a major investment in the conservation and stewardship of America’s public lands.

(HILO) – A newly released study by federal and university researchers provides “encouragement and guidance” for land managers wanting to reestablish ʻōhiʻa stands wiped out by the fungal disease, Rapid ʻŌhiʻa Death, or impacted by other disturbances like volcanic activity and wildland fires. 

(HONOLULU) – As Hawaiʻi Invasive Species Awareness Month (HISAM) drew to a close, a series of award winners were announced by the Hawaiʻi Invasive Species Council (HISC). The awards recognize community members and organizations that have made substantial contributions to protecting Hawaiʻi from the impacts of invasive species.

(LĪHU‘E) – Almost four years after Rapid ʻŌhiʻa Death (ROD) was first detected in a lower-elevation forest in northeast Kaua’i, the fungus known to exclusively infect ʻōhiʻa has been found in a dead ʻōhiʻa in the pristine wilderness area of the Alakaʻi at 4,100-feet elevation. 

(Honolulu) – Invasive species have a devastating effect on the state’s agriculture, food self-sufficiency, freshwater quality and quantity, human health, and on the health of native species and ecosystems. February 1st marks the start of Hawaiʻi Invasive Species Awareness Month (HISAM).

(KAHULUI) – Only one of the islands, comprising Maui Nui, is free from hooved animals. The 32,000-acre Kaho‘olawe no longer experiences ungulate-caused deforestation and the loss of topsoil, after goats, sheep, and cattle were eliminated from the island. 

(KAPAʻA)–Hosting its 4th virtual “Forest Friday” conversation on June 4 the Kauaʻi Invasive Species Committee (KISC) and Kauaʻi Forest Bird Recovery Project (KFBRP) plan to address dwindling forest bird populations on Kaua’i. This month’s topic is: The skies are empty and the forest is quiet. Is it too late to save our native forest birds? 

(LĪHUʻE) – Just in time for Earth Day 2021, Lehua Island, the tiny, but mighty island off Kaua‘i’s west shore has been declared free of damaging, introduced (invasive) rats. After many dec-ades, the island is free of invasive vertebrates, enabling Hawaii’s seabirds to safely nest on the steep rocky shores, and native plants to flourish once again.

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