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(HONOLULU) - Are you a part of the community that cares for our lands and waters?  While natural resource managers and conservation professionals prepare to gather in Honolulu this week for the annual Hawaiʻi Conservation Conference, they represent only a part of the larger community of stewards.  Community-based and civic stewardship groups are crucial to the well-being of our communities, yet many of their activities are not understood or even recognized.  

(Honolulu) – Each day for ten days a group of twenty teenagers gather in the morning for their latest lessons on the preservation of O‘ahu’s coastal, wetland, and forest areas. This is the second year of Kupu Kōkua Camp, a partnership between the DLNR Division of Forestry and Wildlife (DOFAW) and the non-profit Kupu which trains thousands of young people each year in conservation, sustainability and environmental education.

(Honolulu) – Today the DLNR Division of Forestry and Wildlife’s (DOFAW) Kaulunani Urban and Community Forestry Program reached a major milestone. For the last two years a group of volunteers in Kailua have been gathering information on individual trees in Kailua. They measure and map each tree and their data provides valuable information about urban trees that helps resource experts better manage these important community assets.  In recognition of the first team of Citizen Foresters, DLNR/DOFAW presented them with a DLNR & YOU Citizen Conservationist award.

(Puna) – The East Rift Zone Eruption event has destroyed important populations of two of Hawaiʻi’s endangered plants. This loss highlights the importance of managing other threats to native species across the state and the need to increase resilience of such populations.

(Halawa, Moloka‘i) -- It took a community effort over several weeks to successfully clean up various kinds of marine debris from the beautiful beaches at the east end of Moloka‘i. More than 60 big bags full of trash were collected during a team effort between Moloka’i volunteers, a school class, staff from a local ranch, and help from several agencies. The biggest challenge was a net mass that was described as the size of a large SUV in one gigantic doughnut-like ball, about 25-30 yards across.

(Lihue) – Henry and Reese are six-year-old and three-year-old Border Terriers respectively, who spent most of last week crisscrossing the rugged, hot, wind-swept terrain of tiny Lehua Island.  Lehua is a State Seabird Sanctuary and the site of an intensive restoration project over the past nine months to protect seabirds by removing invasive rats. In 2017, the partners of the Lehua Island Restoration Project applied a conservation bait to remove the population of invasive Pacific rats which eat the chicks of nesting seabirds and devour the native plants that help support a large variety of bird life here.

(HONOLULU) – Are you a private landowner, non-profit group, or local government agency interested in protecting and managing forested lands? The Department of Land and Natural Resources (DLNR), Division of Forestry and Wildlife is seeking new projects for two federally-funded forest acquisition programs:  the Community Forest Program and the Hawaiʻi Forest Legacy Program.

(Honolulu) – Deep in the Honouliuli Forest Reserve, high in Oah‘u’s Wai‘anae Mountains, a sophisticated monitoring station is watching Caly 24-hours a day, seven-days a week. Caly (cyanea calycina) or haha in Hawaiian, is one of less than 200 members of this species left on O‘ahu.

LIHU‘E, KAUA‘I -- Polihale State Park on Kaua‘i will reopen to the public on Tuesday May 15, following repairs to the heavily flood-damaged entry road.  The initial repairs, consisting of filling and grading the most damaged section of the unpaved 5-mile roadway and making drainage improvements, will allow for hardy vehicles to access the beach and camping areas within the popular West Kaua‘i park.  A second phase of road repair will be ongoing for approximately two weeks after the reopening, and park visitors may experience some delays due to the construction. 

(HONOLULU) – Following a series of statewide public hearing on proposed changes to rules regulating activities within Hawaii’s Forest Reserve System, the DLNR Division of Forestry and Wildlife is reminding everyone that input and comments on the rules will be accepted until May 11, 2018. The rule changes are in response to evolving natural resource concerns and the needs of managers and forest users.

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