Oʻahu Offshore Islet Seabird Sanctuaries

Oʻahu Offshore Islet Seabird Sanctuaries

webpage header of oahu offshore islets

Table of Contents

  1. Kihewamoku State Wildlife Sanctuary 
  2. Pulemoku Islet Seabird Sanctuary
  3. Mokuʻauʻia Islet Seabird Sanctuary
  4. Kukuihoʻolua Islet Seabird Sanctuary
  5. Kapapa Island Seabird Sanctuary
  6. Kekepa Islet Seabird Sanctuary
  7. Moku Manu Islets Seabird Sanctuary
  8. Mokulea Rock Islet Seabird Sanctuary 
  9. Popoia Island Seabird Sanctuary
  10. Mokulua Islets Seabird Sanctuary
  11. Mānana Island Seabird Sanctuary
  12. Kāohikaipu Islet Seabird Sanctuary
  13. Mokuālai Islet Seabird Sanctuary

webpage header of kihewamoku islet

Kihewamoku Islet Seabird Sanctuary

Description

Kihewamoku Islet Seabird Sanctuary is a small, rocky islet with no vegetation that is closed to the public. This is not a typical home for seabird and is very dangerous to access.

Activities

None. 

Permits & Rules

  • This sanctuary is CLOSED, per administrative rules Chapter 126 (Wildlife Sanctuaries).
  • Commercial activities are prohibited.
  • Other activities (like scientific research, conservation management, or subsistence, traditional, and customary practices by Native Hawaiians consistent with the long-term preservation of the wildlife sanctuary resources) may be possible with a permit. Individuals interested in permits should review the detailed information on our Permits & Guidelines page and contact their local DOFAW office.

Some Native Animals

Animal information for our DOFAW-managed area will be coming soon.


webpage header of pulemoku islet

Pulemoku State Wildlife Sanctuary

Description

Pulemoku islet is located in Maleakahana Bay, just south of Mokuʻauʻia islet. It is a small calcareous islet with no vegetation, approxiametely 1 acres in size and reaches a height of about 10 – 15 ft. Seabird nesting is uncommon on this islet. Pulemoku is closed to the public.

Activities

None.

Permits & Rules

  • This sanctuary is CLOSED, per administrative rules Chapter 126 (Wildlife Sanctuaries).
  • Commercial activities are prohibited.
  • Other activities (like scientific research, conservation management, or subsistence, traditional, and customary practices by Native Hawaiians consistent with the long-term preservation of the wildlife sanctuary resources) may be possible with a permit. Individuals interested in permits should review the detailed information on our Permits & Guidelines page and contact their local DOFAW office.

Some Native Animals

Animal information for our DOFAW-managed area will be coming soon.


webpage header of mokuauia islet

Mokuʻauʻia Islet Seabird Sanctuary

Description

Mokuʻauʻia Islet Seabird Sanctuary, also know as Goat Island, is a medium sized offshore islet that is 12.5 acres. It is located in Lāʻie Bay, Oʻahu, just offshore form Mālaekehana Beach Park.  The islet is  of public access, though visitors are encouraged to stay below the high water mark to avoid trampling seabird burrows. Wedge-tailed shearwaters (ʻUaʻu Kani) and ʻOpaeʻula are often found on the islet.

Activities

Birdwatching, swimming. 

Permits & Rules

  • This sanctuary is RESTRICTED, per administrative rules Chapter 126 (Wildlife Sanctuaries). Access is restricted to areas below the high water mark. The islet is closed from sunset to sunrise. No fires, dogs, camping, tents, tarps, or other structures are allowed at any time.
  • Commercial activities may be possible with a permit. Contact the Oʻahu DOFAW office to discuss.
  • Other activities (like scientific research, conservation management, or subsistence, traditional, and customary practices by Native Hawaiians consistent with the long-term preservation of the wildlife sanctuary resources) may be possible with a permit. Individuals interested in permits should review the detailed information on our Permits & Guidelines page and contact their local DOFAW office.

Some Native Plants & Animals  

These are examples of native species associated with this site. This is not intended to be a comprehensive species inventory.            

image of bird

ʻUaʻu kani

(Ardenna pacifica)

image of opae ula

ʻOpae ʻula

(Halocaridina rubra)

image of hawaiian monk seal

Hawaiian Monk Seal

(Monachus schauinslandi)

image of plant

ʻĀkulikuli

(Sesuvium portulacastrum)

image of ilima flowers

ʻIlima 

(Sida fallax)

image of naupaka kahakai plant with flowers

Naupaka kahakai

(Scaevola taccada)

image of heliotrope plant

Nena

(Heliotropium curassavicum)

image of pohuehue flower

Pohuehue

(Ipomoea pes-caprae subsp. brasiliense)

Photos 


webpage header of kukuihoolua islet seabird sanctuary

Kukuihoʻolua Islet Seabird Sanctuary

Description

Kukuihoʻolua islet is located in Lāʻie Bay, just offshore from Lāʻie Point. The calcareous islet is about 2 acres in size and reaches a height of about 20 ft. There is a prominent arch in the center of the islet.

Common seabird species can be seen on this islet, though they regularly do not nest here. This islet is closed to the public.

Activities

None. 

Permits & Rules

  • This sanctuary is CLOSED, per administrative rules Chapter 126 (Wildlife Sanctuaries).
  • Commercial activities are prohibited.
  • Other activities (like scientific research, conservation management, or subsistence, traditional, and customary practices by Native Hawaiians consistent with the long-term preservation of the wildlife sanctuary resources) may be possible with a permit. Individuals interested in permits should review the detailed information on our Permits & Guidelines page and contact their local DOFAW office.

Some Native Plants & Animals  

These are examples of native species associated with this site. This is not intended to be a comprehensive species inventory.

image of brown footed booby

Brown Booby

(Sula leucogaster plotus)

image of bird

ʻUaʻu kani

(Ardenna pacifica)

image of bird

Noio

(Anous minutus)

image of plant

ʻĀkulikuli

(Sesuvium portulacastrum)


webpage header of kapapa island seabird sanctuary

Kapapa Island Seabird Sanctuary

Description

Kapapa is a small calcareous islet about 9.5 acres in size and reaches a height of 14 ft. Kapapa islet is located in Kaneʻohe Bay approximately 2 miles offshore in the south central portion of the bay, north of Kekepa islet. The outer edges are sharp limestone and lithified dune outcrops with some sandy sections in the interior. The islet is accessible to the public with very little restrictions. Despite the lack of restrictions, many native plants still exist, mostly away from human dominated areas and near the ocean where native plants have a competitive advantage in the harsh salty conditions.

The islet is mostly made up of native species, especially near shore areas. ʻĀkulikuli (Sesuvium portulacastrum) and ʻakiʻaki (Sporobolus virginicus) are found closest to the ocean. There are also a few milo (Thespesia populnea), mostly near the ocean on the southwest side. There are healthy patches of alena (Boerhavia repens) throughout the islet, several hinahina (Heliotropium anomalum var. argenteum) patches on the southeast side near the coast, and large patches of ʻakiʻaki (Sporobolus virginicus), mostly near the margins. Scattered naupaka (Scaevola taccada) patches were observed over most of the islet. Central areas were mostly made up of ʻilima (Sida fallax), alena (Boerhavia repens) and Pau-o-Hiiaka (Jacquemontia ovalifolia subsp. sandwicensis). On the south shore, there are some small patches of koali ʻawa (Ipomoea indica) and kaunaʻoa (Cuscuta sandwichiana). ʻIhi (Portulaca lutea) can be seen in some coastal areas. A few areas of non-native vegetation exists, such as near the landing, along the south shore, and in the central area. Bermuda grass (Cynodon dactylon) lawns were found just above the beach and along the south shore near the landing area. There was also some khaki weed (Alternanthera pungens) and New Zealand spinach (Tetragonia tetragonioides). Ironwood (Casuarina glauca) dominates the central area. Near the fishing shrine where ironwood was cleared from is a patch of sourbush (Pluchea spp.) and Spanish needles (Bidens alba var. radiata). Near the coast are a few sea grape and beach heliotrope (Tournefortia argentea). There is a small patch of pickle weed (Batis maritima) on the south side near the coast.

Activities

Birdwatching, swimming. 

Permits & Rules

  • This sanctuary is RESTRICTED, per administrative rules Chapter 126 (Wildlife Sanctuaries). Access is restricted to areas below the high water mark. The islet is closed from sunset to sunrise. No fires, dogs, camping, tents, tarps, or other structures are allowed at any time.
  • Commercial activities are prohibited.
  • Other activities (like scientific research, conservation management, or subsistence, traditional, and customary practices by Native Hawaiians consistent with the long-term preservation of the wildlife sanctuary resources) may be possible with a permit. Individuals interested in permits should review the detailed information on our Permits & Guidelines page and contact their local DOFAW office.

Some Native Plants & Animals

These are examples of native species associated with this site. This is not intended to be a comprehensive species inventory.

image of bird

ʻUaʻu kani

(Ardenna pacifica)

image of hawaiian monk seal

Hawaiian Monk Seal

(Monachus schauinslandi)

image of plant

ʻĀkulikuli

(Sesuvium portulacastrum)

image of hinahina

Hinahina

(Heliotropum anomalum)

image of ilima flowers

ʻIlima 

(Sida fallax)

image of field of flowers of pau o hiiaka

Pāʻū-o-Hiʻiaka

(Jacquemontia ovalifolia)

image of ihi

ʻIhi

(Portulaca lutea)

image of naupaka kahakai plant with flowers

Naupaka kahakai

(Scaevola taccada)


image of kekepa islet

Kekepa Islet Seabird Sanctuary

Description

Kekepa Islet Seabird Sanctuary, also known as Turtle Rock,  is a 1.5 acres islet located in Kaneʻohe Bay. This lush islet provides a habitat for Bulwer’s Petrel (Oʻu) and Wedge-tailed Shearwaters (Uʻau kani). This islet is closed to the public, but can be seen from most of Kaneʻohe’s beaches.

Activities

None.

Permits & Rules

  • This sanctuary is CLOSED, per administrative rules Chapter 126 (Wildlife Sanctuaries).
  • Commercial activities are prohibited.
  • Other activities (like scientific research, conservation management, or subsistence, traditional, and customary practices by Native Hawaiians consistent with the long-term preservation of the wildlife sanctuary resources) may be possible with a permit. Individuals interested in permits should review the detailed information on our Permits & Guidelines page and contact their local DOFAW office.

Some Native Plants & Animals

These are examples of native species associated with this site. This is not intended to be a comprehensive species inventory.

image of bird

ʻUaʻu kani 

(Ardenna pacifica)

image of bird flying

ʻOu

(Bulweria bulwerii)

image of ohelo kai plant

ʻŌhelo kai

(Lycium sandwicense)

image of ilima flowers

ʻIlima 

(Sida fallax)

image of plant

ʻĀkulikuli

(Sesuvium portulacastrum)

image of ihi

ʻIhi

(Portulaca lutea)

image of hinahina

Hinahina

(Heliotropum anomalum)

image of flower

Maiapilo

(Capparis sandwichiana)

 


webpage header of moku manu islets

Moku Manu Islets Seabird Sanctuary

Description

Moku Manu Islets Seabird Sanctuary consists of two islets that totals 16.6 acres located off of Mōkapu Peninsula. It has a relatively flat top, averaging about 165 feet in height but running up to 202 feet. The cliffs of Moku Manu drop directly into the sea around more than half of the island. Moku Manu is difficult to access and is closed to the public due to its status as a Seabird Sanctuary.

Moku Manu is home to the most diverse and one of the densest seabird colonies in the Main Hawaiian Islands. Seabird species such as Wedge-tailed Shearwaters (ʻUʻau Kani), Black Noddy (Noio), Brown Noddy (Noio kōhā), Bulwer’s Petrel (ʻOu), Red-tailed Tropicbirds (Koaʻe ʻula), Sooty Terns (‘Ewa ʻEwa), Great Frigatebird (ʻIwa), Christmas Shearwater, Grey-backed Tern (Pākalakala), various Booby species, and various common shorebird species.

Activities

None.

Permits & Rules

  • This sanctuary is CLOSED, per administrative rules Chapter 126 (Wildlife Sanctuaries).
  • Commercial activities are prohibited.
  • Other activities (like scientific research, conservation management, or subsistence, traditional, and customary practices by Native Hawaiians consistent with the long-term preservation of the wildlife sanctuary resources) may be possible with a permit. Individuals interested in permits should review the detailed information on our Permits & Guidelines page and contact their local DOFAW office.

Some Native Plants & Animals       

 These are examples of native species associated with this site. This is not intended to be a comprehensive species inventory.

image of bird

ʻUaʻu kani

(Ardenna pacifica)

image of bird

Noio

(Anous minutus)

image of noio koha or brown noddy standing

Noio kōhā

(Anous stolidus pileatus)

image of bird flying

ʻOu

(Bulweria bulwerii)

image of bird flying

Koaʻeʻula

(Phaethon rubricauda)

ʻIwa

(Fregata minor palmerstoni)

photo of red footed booby

Red-footed Booby

(Sula sula)

image of brown footed booby

Brown Booby

(Sula leucogaster plotus)

image of plant

ʻĀkulikuli

(Sesuvium portulacastrum)

image of nohu flower

Nohu 

(Tribulus cistoides)

 

 

Photos 


webpage header of mokulea rock islet

Mokulea Rock Islet Seabird Sanctuary

Description

Mokulea Rock Islet Seabird Sanctuary is 0.35 acres of rock habitat and is home to seabirds that like to nest in crevices. Seabirds species such as the Brown Noddy (Noio Kōha), Black Noddy (Noio), and Bulwer’s Petrel (ʻOu). This islet is closed to the public, but is viewable from the Marine Corps Base in Kaneʻohe Bay and from many beaches in Kailua. 

Activities

None. 

Permits & Rules

  • This sanctuary is CLOSED, per administrative rules Chapter 126 (Wildlife Sanctuaries).
  • Commercial activities are prohibited.
  • Other activities (like scientific research, conservation management, or subsistence, traditional, and customary practices by Native Hawaiians consistent with the long-term preservation of the wildlife sanctuary resources) may be possible with a permit. Individuals interested in permits should review the detailed information on our Permits & Guidelines page and contact their local DOFAW office.

Some Native Plants & Animals

These are examples of native species associated with this site. This is not intended to be a comprehensive species inventory.

image of bird flying

ʻOu

(Bulweria bulwerii)

image of bird

Noio

(Anous minutus)

image of noio koha or brown noddy standing

Noio kōhā

(Anous stolidus pileatus)

image of ohelo kai plant

ʻŌhelo kai

(Lycium sandwicense)

 


webpage header of popoia islet

Popoʻia Islet Seabird Sanctuary

Description

Popoʻia Seabird Sanctuary, also known as Flat Island, is 3.67 acres off the coast of Kailua Beach and Lanikai Beach. The ecosystem of the islet is vegetated coral which is utilized primarily by Wedge-tailed shearwaters (ʻUaʻa Kani), Bulwer’s Petrel (ʻOu), and pigeons. ‘Opae‘ula can also be spotted on this islet.

This islet is accessible to the public, and has a trail that follows the perimeter. Please read the signs when visiting the islet, and encourage other visitors to stay outside the nesting area.

Management and monitoring of this islet is essential for the seabirds that inhabit it. Listed below are the management goals and objectives of this islet:

  • Manage commercial and recreational activity on islet using signage, commercial permit system, outreach, and education to promote habitat and species protection.
  • Remove invasive weeds, prevent non-native weeds from establishment. Replace removed weeds with native species.
  • Survey and inventory of seabirds. Shearwater fledglings are counted each year in designated survey plots. Entire islet is counted to track number of fledged Bulwer’s Petrels.
  • Protect nesting areas by placing rope barriers to establish boundaries for sensitive nesting areas.

Activities

Hiking, birdwatching, swimming, kayaking. 

Permits & Rules

  • This sanctuary is RESTRICTED, per administrative rules Chapter 126 (Wildlife Sanctuaries). Access is restricted to areas below the high water mark. The islet is closed from sunset to sunrise. No fires, dogs, camping, tents, tarps, or other structures are allowed at any time.
  • Commercial activities may be possible with a permit. Contact the Oʻahu DOFAW office to discuss.
  • Other activities (like scientific research, conservation management, or subsistence, traditional, and customary practices by Native Hawaiians consistent with the long-term preservation of the wildlife sanctuary resources) may be possible with a permit. Individuals interested in permits should review the detailed information on our Permits & Guidelines page and contact their local DOFAW office.

Some Native Plants & Animals

image of bird

ʻUaʻu kani

(Ardenna pacifica)

image of bird flying

ʻOu

(Bulweria bulwerii)

image of opae ula

ʻOpae ʻula

(Halocaridina rubra)

image of hawaiian monk seal

Hawaiian Monk Seal

(Monachus schauinslandi)

image of flower

Maiapilo

(Capparis sandwichiana)

image of hinahina

Hinahina

(Heliotropum anomalum)

image of ihi

ʻIhi

(Portulaca lutea)

image of ohelo kai plant

ʻŌhelo kai

(Lycium sandwicense)

Photos 


image of mokulua islets

Mokulua Islets Seabird Sanctuary

Description

Mokulua Islets Seabird Sanctuary is composed of two islets, the larger northern islet, Mokulua Nui and smaller more southern islet, Mokulua Iki. Both islets are home to Wedge-tailed shearwaters (‘Ua’u Kani) for nesting. Along with that, other shorebird and seabird species can be seen there.

These offshore islets are accessible to the public, but vistors are encouraged to stay below the high water line to reduce the chance of trampling seabird burrows.

Activities

Birdwatching, kayaking.

Permits & Rules

  • This sanctuary is RESTRICTED, per administrative rules Chapter 126 (Wildlife Sanctuaries). Access is restricted to areas below the high water mark. The islets are closed from sunset to sunrise. No fires, dogs, camping, tents, tarps, or other structures are allowed at any time.
  • Commercial activities may be possible with a permit on Mokunui (the larger and northern of the two islets) only. Contact the Oʻahu DOFAW office to discuss.
  • Other activities (like scientific research, conservation management, or subsistence, traditional, and customary practices by Native Hawaiians consistent with the long-term preservation of the wildlife sanctuary resources) may be possible with a permit. Individuals interested in permits should review the detailed information on our Permits & Guidelines page and contact their local DOFAW office.

Some Native Plants & Animals

These are examples of native species associated with this site. This is not intended to be a comprehensive species inventory.

image of bird

ʻUaʻu kani

(Ardenna pacifica)

image of hawaiian monk seal

Hawaiian Monk Seal

(Monachus schauinslandi)

image of field of flowers of pau o hiiaka

Pāʻū-o-Hiʻiaka

(Jacquemontia ovalifolia)

image of naupaka kahakai plant with flowers

Naupaka kahakai

(Scaevola taccada)

image of pili grass

Pili

(Heterogpogon contortus)

image of flower

Maiapilo

(Capparis sandwichiana)

image of pua kala

Pua kala

(Argemone gluaca)

 

Photos 


webpage header of manana island

Mānana Island Seabird Sanctuary

Description

Manana Island Seabird Sanctuary, also known unofficially as Rabbit Island,  is the largest offshore islet in Oʻahu at 67 acres. This seabird sanctuary is closed to the public. Non-native invasive weeds, rats, tropical fire ants, and yellow-crazy ants threaten this islands habitat. Restoration efforts of this islet are crucial due to the amount of seabirds that call it home such as Wedge-tailed shearwater (ʻUaʻu kani), Bulwer’s Petrel (O’u), Red-tailed Tropicbird (Koaʻeʻula), and Sooty Tern (ʻEwaʻewa). 

Activities

None.

Permits & Rules

  • This sanctuary is CLOSED, per administrative rules Chapter 126 (Wildlife Sanctuaries).
  • Commercial activities are prohibited.
  • Other activities (like scientific research, conservation management, or subsistence, traditional, and customary practices by Native Hawaiians consistent with the long-term preservation of the wildlife sanctuary resources) may be possible with a permit. Individuals interested in permits should review the detailed information on our Permits & Guidelines page and contact their local DOFAW office.

Some Native Plants & Animals

These are examples of native species associated with this site. This is not intended to be a comprehensive species inventory.

image of bird

ʻUaʻu kani

(Ardenna pacifica)

image of bird

Noio

(Anous minutus)

image of noio koha or brown noddy standing

Noio kōhā

(Anous stolidus pileatus)

image of bird flying

ʻOu

(Bulweria bulwerii)

image of bird flying

Koaʻeʻula

(Phaethon rubricauda)

image of hawaiian monk seal

Hawaiian Monk Seal

(Monachus schauinslandi)

image of pua kala

Pua kala

(Argemone gluaca)

image of pohuehue flower

Pohuehue

(Ipomoea pes-caprae subsp. brasiliense)

image of naupaka kahakai plant with flowers

Naupaka kahakai

(Scaevola taccada)

image of plant

ʻĀkulikuli

(Sesuvium portulacastrum)

 

 

Photos 


webpage header of kaohikaipu islet

Kāohikaipu Islet Seabird Sanctuary

Description

Closed to the public, this offshore islet is 11 acres of low growing mixed native and non-native vegetation located off the shore of Makapuʻu Beach Park. Wedge-tailed shearwaters are common to this seabird sanctuary, as well as other seabird species. This seabird sanctuary can be viewed from Makapuʻu Lighthouse Trail.

Activities

None

Permits & Rules

  • This sanctuary is CLOSED, per administrative rules Chapter 126 (Wildlife Sanctuaries).
  • Commercial activities are prohibited.
  • Other activities (like scientific research, conservation management, or subsistence, traditional, and customary practices by Native Hawaiians consistent with the long-term preservation of the wildlife sanctuary resources) may be possible with a permit. Individuals interested in permits should review the detailed information on our Permits & Guidelines page and contact their local DOFAW office.

Some Native Plants & Animals

These are examples of native species associated with this site. This is not intended to be a comprehensive species inventory.

image of bird

ʻUaʻu kani

(Ardenna pacifica)

image of pua kala

Pua kala

(Argemone gluaca)

image of heliotrope plant

Nena

(Heliotropium curassavicum)

image of field of flowers of pau o hiiaka

Pāʻū-o-Hiʻiaka

(Jacquemontia ovalifolia)

image of ohelo kai plant

ʻŌhelo kai

(Lycium sandwicense)

image of naupaka kahakai plant with flowers

Naupaka kahakai

(Scaevola taccada)

image of plant

ʻĀkulikuli

(Sesuvium portulacastrum)

image of ilima flowers

ʻIlima 

(Sida fallax)

Photos


webpage header of mokualai islet

Mokuālai Islet Seabird Sanctuary

Description

Mokualai is located in Lāʻie Bay, south of Kukuihoʻolua islet, just off of Lāʻie Pt. It is a small coralline islet, approximately 1 acre in size reaching a height of about 20 ft.

Activities

None.

Permits & Rules

  • This sanctuary is CLOSED, per administrative rules Chapter 126 (Wildlife Sanctuaries).
  • Commercial activities are prohibited.
  • Other activities (like scientific research, conservation management, or subsistence, traditional, and customary practices by Native Hawaiians consistent with the long-term preservation of the wildlife sanctuary resources) may be possible with a permit. Individuals interested in permits should review the detailed information on our Permits & Guidelines page and contact their local DOFAW office.

Some Native Plants & Animals

These are examples of native species associated with this site. This is not intended to be a comprehensive species inventory.

image of bird

ʻUaʻu kani

(Ardenna pacifica

image of bird

Noio

(Anous minutus)

image of brown footed booby

Brown Booby

(Sula leucogaster plotus)

photo of red footed booby

Red-footed Booby

(Sula sula)

image of plant

ʻĀkulikuli

(Sesuvium portulacastrum)